The Silent Salesman: Relying On Your Product To Drive Growth

For as long as I can remember, the traditional sales strategy involved a highly active sales team pounding the pavement, crisscrossing the country to attend trade shows, and lots and lots of phone calls and follow-up emails. The goal is to get in front of potential customers to tell them what your product offers and why they need it. For SaaS companies, the initial goal is to book a product demo. However, as the industry dynamics evolve, so do the engagement methods. There’s undoubtedly still a place for this approach, but there’s a new kid in town called product-led growth (PLG), and let’s just say there’s talk.
Let Your Product Do The Talking
In the early 2000s, SaaS companies turned heads when they started using their products to attract and retain new customers rather than relying solely on their sales and marketing teams to push leads through the sales funnel. Once the sales touch is removed, you really only have your products to drive growth—hence, the term product-led growth.
The Diverging Paths To Business Growth
Everyone is familiar with sales-led organizations. They prioritize human interaction as a way to sell products and services. Simply put, they let the sales team do what it does best—relationship building and articulating the value of their products and services. With this strategy, customers typically have to request a demo and have a sales team member walk them through all the bells and whistles of the product to see it in action. And don’t get me wrong, this way is still alive and well. It’s particularly effective for complex products that don’t lend themselves to self-guided experimentation.
Contrarily, product-led organizations let customers self-serve, meaning they get to use a product before they speak to anyone at the organization.
Shifting The Product Development Mindset
The thought process toward product development often leans heavily on the technological aspect, prompting questions like "How do we build this?" and "Who would want this product?" However, I’ve realized that this approach isn’t that effective.
Core Advantages Of A Product-Led Growth Strategy
Customer Benefits
-Superior User Experience: Free or limited access trials let users autonomously assess the value of a product at their own pace, allowing customers to experience your product when and how they want without any hurdles.
-Continuous Customer Feedback Loop: This helps you improve the product in real time and focus on developing products that meet the needs of your current and future customers.
Business Benefits
-Shorter Sales Cycle: Self-onboarding removes the obstacles (e.g., human interaction and demo requirements) for potential customers so they can immediately start using your product. Converting them into paying customers doesn’t take long if they find it valuable.
-High Retention/Lower Churn Rates: Creating customer-centric products and delivering them to users with a dedication to product enhancement increases customer satisfaction, making it easier to attract and retain customers.
Attracting And Retaining Customers Through User Experiences
Customers expect a lot these days. To thrive, businesses must take a highly focused, customer-first approach to product development and delivery. Trials or "freemiums" allow customers to test drive a product or solution before making a purchase decision.
This methodology creates a win-win situation for the customers and the organization, making it an effective strategy for SaaS businesses aiming for sustainable growth.

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5 Risks of Outsourcing Software Development and How to Avoid Them

Outsourcing software development has witnessed a surge in popularity, offering organizations a strategic advantage by tapping into global talent pools. According to Precedence Research, the global IT outsourcing market is expected to grow to $1.149 billion by 2032. Outsourcing provides various benefits, including lower recruiting and onboarding costs, increased delivery speed, and filled talent gaps. It’s no wonder why the strategy is so popular.
However, navigating the outsourcing landscape isn’t always easy and requires a keen awareness of the potential risks. In this blog, we'll discuss five critical risks of this widely adopted strategy and provide tactics to reduce risk in delivered software.
Risk 1: Quality Assurance Concerns
Ensuring the quality of software is a constant concern, especially across different work environments, methodologies, and coding styles. Developers make mistakes, whether they’re in-house or externally sourced. It is estimated that software developers make 100 to 150 errors for every thousand lines of code. And when working with an outsourced team, controlling the quality of the code produced becomes even more difficult because they’re writing the code outside of the four theoretical walls of your organization. If the code is poor quality, it can lead to costly issues in production, increased technical debt, missed deadlines, and poorly performing software, among other impacts.
Risk 2: Data Security and Confidentiality
Data security and confidentiality are top priorities; if left unchecked, they can have costly consequences. In fact, a report by IBM states that the average cost of a data breach is estimated to be $4.24 million. So, entrusting an outsourced team with your code and sensitive information can be scary because it opens a door to potential vulnerabilities.
The nature of sharing proprietary code and confidential data with outsourced teams introduces challenges centered around protecting critical assets. Intellectual property, trade secrets, and any confidential practices that provide a competitive edge are at the forefront of these concerns. Additionally, mishandling or unauthorized access to user information can lead to legal ramifications and reputational damage. The potential vulnerabilities may arise from various sources, such as inadequate security protocols within the outsourced team, unintentional data leaks, or even malicious activities.
Risk 3: Communication Challenges
Clear communication is paramount in software development, and outsourcing introduces unique challenges. The geographical and cultural distance can lead to a lack of shared context and understanding. Differences in languages and work practices can cause misinterpretations of requirements, expectations, or even project milestones. Plus, teams located in varying time zones can amplify misunderstandings. This asynchronous nature of work makes real-time collaboration difficult and can slow down communication, hinder issue resolution, and impact overall project efficiency.
Risk 4: Lack of Control and Oversight
Managing a project without the day-to-day oversight inherent to in-house employees is a uniquely difficult challenge when using outsourced teams. The absence of immediate control introduces uncertainty, especially in critical areas such as meeting deadlines, ensuring quality, and adhering to project requirements. Without the ability to oversee every aspect in real time, there's a risk of misalignment between expectations and actual progress. Deadlines are missed, quality assurance feels distant, and there's always the concern of veering off the agreed-upon path.
Risk 5: Hidden Costs and Budget Overruns
Unexpected costs can jeopardize project budgets and timelines. According to a report by Deloitte, 57% of organizations have experienced cost overruns in their outsourcing projects. The challenge lies in the potential for unforeseen costs that can exceed the budget. These hidden costs can manifest in various forms – from unexpected software license fees to additional development hours required for unanticipated issues and complexities. The risk of budget overruns becomes an ever-present burden that can jeopardize the financial stability of your project.
Achieve success while avoiding the risks
Outsourcing software development offers unparalleled advantages, but success hinges on proactive risk management. By addressing communication challenges, ensuring quality assurance, prioritizing data security, maintaining control and oversight, and transparently managing budgets, organizations can forge successful and collaborative partnerships that help sustain the performance of their software.

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Accelerating startup success: the role of MVP in agile software Development

In the fast-paced world of startups, the ability to swiftly bring a product to market can often be the key differentiator between success and failure. As entrepreneurs embark on their journey to create innovative solutions, the adoption of a well-structured product development strategy becomes crucial. One such strategy gaining prominence is the minimum viable product (MVP) in startup software development, coupled with the agile SDLC. This dynamic duo has proven to be a game-changer for startups looking to optimize their development processes and deliver value to customers efficiently.
The power of MVP in startup software development
MVP defined
At the heart of successful startup software development lies the concept of the Minimum Viable Product (MVP). An MVP is a strategically stripped-down version of a product that includes only its core features. The primary goal of MVP startup software development is to quickly launch the product into the market to gather valuable user feedback, allowing for iterative improvements based on actual user experiences.
Benefits of MVP in startup software development
The benefits of adopting a Minimum Viable Product (MVP) approach in startup software development extend beyond the initial expedited time-to-market. One of the key advantages is the significant enhancement of cost-efficiency throughout the development lifecycle.
Developing a full-featured product demands substantial financial resources, which may strain a startup’s budget. In contrast, an MVP allows startups to channel their resources strategically.
Furthermore, the MVP strategy establishes a valuable user feedback loop. Early deployment of a product allows startups to garner real-time insights into user experiences and preferences.
MVP startup software development in action
To better understand the practical application of MVP in startup software development, consider a hypothetical scenario where a new social networking platform is being developed. The MVP for this project could include essential features like user registration, profile creation, and basic social interaction functionalities. Once launched, early adopters can provide feedback, guiding subsequent development phases.

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Scrum Master vs. Project Manager: Which One Is Right For You?

Scrum masters and project managers can both be critical to the successful completion of a project. It’s not uncommon for scrum masters and project managers to work on projects together, but when you compare scrum master vs. project manager roles, there are clear differences.
Scrum master and project manager are both excellent career options. If you’re contemplating becoming a scrum master vs. project manager, make sure to keep a few things in mind. In this article, you’ll find information on how both roles are similar and how they differ.
What Is a Scrum Master?
A scrum master works with a scrum team to guide the teammates through creating large products in short cycles or iterations. This involves tackling tasks from a backlog of planned work, assessing each completed step and perfecting the work to reach set goals.
Scrum masters ensure that their scrum teams adhere to scrum principles to achieve the best results in product development.
Scrum Master Role and Responsibilities
Scrum masters work within the scrum framework, using agile methodologies to guide their teams toward specific goals. Below are a scrum master’s typical responsibilities.
-Keep a scrum team on task and ensure team members produce high-quality work while following scrum principles. Have a thorough understanding of scrum principles and agile methodology as they pertain to product development.
-Guide scrum teams as they work through sprint backlogs to reach each sprint’s goals.
-Facilitate daily scrum meetings to assess the progress the team has made toward the set goals, and make adjustments if needed.
-Maintain communication with product development teams to meet any challenges or problems head-on. Resolve any issues that could stall the product development process.
What Is a Project Manager?
Successful project managers assume leadership roles, handling important logistical elements of a project. Essential project management skills include planning, organizing, scheduling and ensuring that a project is completed successfully and on time.
Project managers stick with a project through its lifecycle, from beginning to end.
Project Manager Role and Responsibilities
Project managers manage activities through a project’s entire lifecycle, including the initiation, planning, execution and closure phases. Their responsibilities include the following.
-Handle the initial elements of a project, such as defining its scope and making plans for others working on the project to follow.
-Determine the cost of a project and make sure it stays within the allotted budget. This may include reallocating resources in the event of unanticipated expenses.
-Manage a project’s human resources, including interviewing and hiring team members and other staff.
-Monitor the progress of a project. This includes troubleshooting any problems, assessing risks and handling any aspects that could affect the quality of the project.
-Communicate with stakeholders to keep everyone informed about a project’s progress.
What Are the Similarities Between Scrum Master and Project Manager?
Scrum Masters and project managers both play important roles in project development. They are responsible for communicating with team members, developers and other stakeholders. They must be able to assess situations and adapt as they work with others to complete projects that align with previously established goals.
What Are the Differences Between Scrum Master and Project Manager?
Scrum Masters work within the Scrum framework by implementing Scrum principles. They ensure that each segment of a project is executed properly, and they make adaptations as necessary to reach set goals.
Project managers focus more on the logistical elements of a project’s lifecycle, including schedules, budgets, risk management and resource allocation. These professionals can work with any type of project, not only within the Scrum framework.
Which Role is Right for You?
Since Scrum Masters and project managers fill such different roles, there are many factors to consider as you determine whether you want to become a Scrum Master or project manager.
If you like the idea of guiding teams through individual increments of a project to reach a successful outcome, then a Scrum Master position might be the best option for you. If you prefer to manage a project’s logistical elements in their entirety—from the planning and implementation stages through completion—then working as a project manager may be a better fit for you.

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6 tips for leading agile transformation

Agile transformation is the process of transitioning an organization to a nimble, reactive approach based on agile principles. The goal is to breathe new life into a business by creating an environment that embraces creativity and innovation, empowers employees and reduces unnecessary layers of management.
“Technology has never moved faster than it has today,” says Paddy Lemons, principal consultant at Burendo. “From smart phones, to ChatGPT, to driverless cars, to drone delivery – our everyday experiences and daily interactions with products and services are unrecognizable versus just 20 years ago. To enable organizations to thrive in this environment, they must prioritize agility as a strategic imperative.”
Like all major business undertakings, agile transformation is complex and requires significant investment. Leading an agile transformation process can therefore present a number of challenges.
Here are six tips for successfully leading agile transformation.
Truly commit to agility
Your personal commitment to agility is one of the most critical success factors in creating the change you desire, says Lemons. “Your team will mirror your behaviors, so the importance of genuinely adopting an experimental mindset cannot be overstated.”
Nominate agile champions
Nominate some agile champions who understand agile and the benefits it brings but also understand the goals of the organization’s transformation, says Melissa Kirby, senior consultant at Burendo. “These champions, who work alongside the rest of the teams, can help spread the knowledge of agile, answer any questions and shut down any doubts.”
Be accountable and listen
It’s always useful to appoint a lead for the project to ensure it meets the required outcomes and sticks to timescales, but it’s equally as important to work with those who are impacted and might end up using the system, says Chris, marketing coordinator at manufacturing and processing machinery firm MattressTek.
Embed security into agile
If your company is going through an agile transformation, it’s more important than ever that your security team is embedded inside your software engineering team, says Chris Bender, VP of security at ClickUp. “Security and software engineering must become one-in-the-same, and security can no longer just point out risks but needs to be involved in helping to find solutions.”
Leadership support for agile
Leadership must sell the vision and goals of agile transformation, ensuring they transform the culture of their organization alongside their ways of working. “Your leadership must empower individuals to reach their potential, making agility not just a methodology but a fundamental ethos that guides the organization toward resilience and innovation,” says Lemons.
Give people time and training
If a team is expected to adopt agile ways of working, then the people will need to be given the time and training to perform the roles well, or else they won’t be motivated, team morale will drop and the squad will have limited success, says Kirby. “If you don’t take steps to win over your people, then you’re always going to face resistance to change,” Kirby adds.

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Community Building And Values: Key Approaches To Entrepreneurship

In the world of entrepreneurship, the path to success is rarely a straight line. Instead, it's a journey marked by highs and lows, triumphs and setbacks. With 18% of small businesses not making it past the first year and 65% of businesses failing within 10 years, as the Chamber of Commerce reported, entrepreneurs need to adopt a mindset that will help them weather the inevitable storms they will face.
Embracing Challenges As Opportunities
The entrepreneurial landscape is fraught with challenges. Each hurdle, rejection, and failure are integral parts of the journey.
“The key to thriving in the face of challenges lies in how you perceive these obstacles. Do you see them as insurmountable barriers or as chances to improve and innovate? This perspective makes all the difference. Embracing resilience is key to entrepreneurial success. Facing challenges and setbacks is an inevitable part of the journey. Instead of viewing obstacles as insurmountable, see them as opportunities to learn, grow, and innovate. Remember that many successful ventures have emerged from the ashes of failure. Cultivate a mindset of perseverance, adaptability, and continuous learning. Every setback is a step closer to your goal, as long as you're willing to persist and learn from each experience,” says Claudio Bravo, CEO of Bravo Luxury. Bravo has navigated turbulent waters, from humble beginnings in a small town in Chile to becoming a prominent real estate developer in the Coachella Valley, and can attest to the importance of mindset in the face of challenges.
Betting On Yourself
Central to this journey is a profound belief in oneself and a foundational trust in one’s abilities and vision. This means investing time, resources, and energy into your ideas and capabilities. “Taking calculated risks is part and parcel of successful entrepreneurship. It's about believing in your potential to succeed, even when others might have doubts,” says Bravo.
Science Direct research shows a clear link between self-confidence and entrepreneurial success. Bravo’s self-confidence helped him successfully navigate the 2008 housing market crisis.
Handling Rejection In High-Stakes Investments
One of the most daunting aspects of entrepreneurship is facing rejection, especially when it involves significant financial pursuits. What separates the top entrepreneurs from everyone else is their approach to rejection.
“Each 'no' should be viewed not as a door closing but as a stepping stone to a 'yes.' It's essential to seek feedback from these rejections and use it constructively to refine your pitch, business model, or strategy,” he advises.
Moreover, timing can be crucial. A 'no' today might become a 'yes' when the market or business is more mature. Entrepreneurs must recognize that rejection is not a reflection of their worth but a standard part of the entrepreneurial process,” explains Bravo.
Due to its turbulent nature, the entrepreneurial journey is not for the faint of heart. It requires a combination of resilience, self-belief, and the ability to view setbacks as opportunities.
Betting on yourself, embracing continuous learning, and handling rejections with grace and determination are the hallmarks of successful entrepreneur. Remember, every challenge faced is a lesson learned, and every setback is a setup for a comeback. Keep pushing forward, never give up, and watch your entrepreneurial dreams become a reality.

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Crucial Foundations: Unveiling the Importance of Minimum Viable Products (MVP)

In the dynamic world of contemporary business, the idea of minimum viable products (MVP) remains a key part of advancement and strategic development. This article delves into the importance of MVPs, investigating their critical role in product development. From the essential standards of MVPs to the various advantages they offer, this discussion intends to unravel their importance. As we journey through the subtleties of MVP implementation across different businesses, we shed light on the normal difficulties organizations experience in this pursuit. Lock in for a comprehensive investigation of the essential foundations of MVPs in the consistently developing business development landscape.
The Core Concept of MVP:
At the essence of current product development, the minimum viable products (MVP) is an essential methodology that reforms how organizations develop. An MVP isn’t just a downsized variant of a product; rather, it is a fastidiously organized model that exemplifies the fundamental functionalities vital for tending to the necessities of the interest group.
Benefits of Implementing MVP:
The advantages of implementing minimum viable products (MVP) are complex, with a fast cycle and a powerful feedback loop being the foundation of this approach. Through the arrival of a fundamental product rendition, organizations can quickly gather important criticism from clients. This iterative cycle works with consistent improvement, guaranteeing that ensuing emphases adjust intimately with advancing client inclinations and market requests.
Additionally, MVPs contribute to cost productivity and resource optimization. Traditional, full-scale product development without approval can cause significant expenses.
Moreover, MVPs offer the priceless benefit of early market approval. By sending off an insignificant rendition, organizations can notice true client collaborations, checking the product’s reasonability.
MVP in Different Industries:
The flexibility of the MVP idea extends across different industries, reshaping how products are developed and brought to market.
Tech, New Businesses, And Software Development:
In the tech domain, MVPs assume a critical role in testing software ideas and functionalities. Organizations dispatch an essential variant of their product to a select user group, working with the distinguishing proof of bugs, grasping client conduct, and refining the product before a full-scale launch.
Consumer Electronics:
The consumer electronic industry decisively utilizes MVPs to test models, highlighting insignificant elements. Manufacturers influence this way to deal with survey client responses, assess the possibility of the product, and make essential changes before entering large-scale manufacturing.
Healthcare Innovation:
In the healthcare sector, accuracy is vital, and MVPs are key for plotting new medical devices or software apps. This approach permits healthcare associations to guarantee that the result satisfies rigid administrative guidelines while tending to the particular requirements of medical care experts and patients.
Conclusion:
In conclusion, embracing minimum viable products (MVP) isn’t simply a decision; it is an essential basis for associations exploring the complexities of current business. Through a careful comprehension of the central idea, outfitting the advantages, and skillfully tending to normal difficulties, organizations can employ MVPs as powerful instruments for development, market approval, and supported development across different enterprises.

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The 'Lean Pirate' Framework: A Fresh Perspective On Product Management

In 2015, during my tenure at a large e-commerce company as a principal product manager, I found myself spearheading an ambitious project: expanding the company to more than 100 countries lacking a local e-commerce presence. The pressing question? “Which features do we incorporate into our new cross-border e-commerce product?”
Despite the vast resources poured into its development, the initial version—crafted over 14 months with input from more than 100 developers—didn't resonate with the global audience. The feedback was clear: Customers preferred shopping through the company's existing platforms with their extensive product range, rather than navigating a separate global platform. Within a month of its beta launch, the response was overwhelmingly negative. Shockingly, users abandoned the app within mere seconds of their first interaction. A staggering 98% drop-off rate within just two days seemed to suggest only the company's employees were hanging around to test the product.
Faced with this glaring setback, we had to make the daunting decision to scrap months of effort and re-strategize.
Rooted in the lean startup movement and the pirate metrics concept prevalent among startups, the lean pirate framework became our guiding beacon.
Lean Pirate Framework: Tailoring Features For New Products
The lean startup methodology emphasizes hypothesis validation before product development. The riskier the hypothesis, the more urgent its validation. While “pirate metrics”—with its catchy AARRR acronym (acquisition, activation, retention, referral, revenue)—defined which product features to focus on.
Merging these philosophies birthed our lean pirate framework. To implement this framework in your own company, it must be centered around:
-Singularity in focus: The first principle is that you need to identify the one killer feature in your product and get it right. Any additional features should not be developed unless they are required, as per the other principles in the framework.
-Immediate value delivery: Users must instantly perceive the product's value to prevent abandonment.
-Retention and stickiness: While retention emphasizes recurring user engagement, stickiness impedes users from migrating to competitors.
-Product-led growth: Both the lean startup principles and pirate metrics concept require that your product have functionality, which supports its growth. Now popularized as "product-led growth," ensure you have features that drive customers to increase purchases and invite more customers.
-Monetization strategy: It's pivotal to blueprint monetization pathways upfront. Rather than merely allowing transactions, the user's entire purchase journey needs meticulous planning. Armed with this funnel, introducing analytics can sharpen future conversion strategies.
The "lean pirate" framework isn't just a methodology; it's a mindset that refines product management for the modern era. Through this lens, businesses can craft experiences, not just products, and adapt to the nuanced needs of a global audience.

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Future of (Product) Managers in an AI-led world: Here is how to thrive

The field of product management is rapidly changing, and the rise of artificial intelligence (AI) is transforming the way products are developed, marketed, and sold.
With AI becoming more mainstream and capable to automate a lot of mundane tasks, Product Management role is up for a real disruption and many product managers will face the heat in the coming days.
Market trends in 2023 and beyond

There are 2 mega trends at play in the world today:
1.Economic downturn
2.Rise of generative AI (and automations)
Combine the two trends, layoffs and cost cuttings are bound to happen (obviously speaking).
Recession-proof skills in any company
When it comes to any company, two skills that are recession proof are:
1.Either you can create (i.e engineering)
2.Or you can sell (sales)
Of course, the above 2 roles are also being let go of, but that’s because companies have hired too many engineers/sales teams (look at Twitter).
The product management role needs to be reimagined, as it has lately become ‘the’ lucrative role everyone is going after.
The PM role has often been debated and unlike any other role in the tech industry, product management role has its own flavor depending on the company, team and industry.
Redefining Product Management Role
What about Product Management? I believe, there are 2 ways to look at it:
1.Product management as a function, as a skill
2.Product management as a role, a title
The reality of most product management roles
A lot of product managers are in for that ‘managerial’ title, where they are neither coding nor selling or marketing — and are mostly doing program management role, i.e. interfacing with engg, product, marketing, sales etc.
Of course, this is much needed, but what are the real skills expected from a product manager?
What are the skills of a product manager?
Skill wise, I’d divide the Product Management role in 2 broad buckets.
1.Core skills.
2.Functional skills
Note that these aren’t mutually exclusive roles, but a healthy overlap is needed to really ensure that the product manager is the one person to ask/discuss anything related to the customer needs.
What kind of a product manager are you?
Are you a functional product manager or the one who is deeply performing core skills?
Of course, there is going to be an overlap between the two — but if you don’t own customer interactions and you are not going out and talking, you are not performing the core skills, it’s going to be a tough time ahead.
How to really thrive in 2023 and beyond?
Build on core skills.
Learn to ask a lot of questions.
Have an open mind when it comes to customer interactions.
Own the show.

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The AI revolution in software development: Enhancing productivity and reducing cognitive load

The potential for artificial intelligence to enhance developer productivity is immense. With AI-powered tools and algorithms assisting developers in tasks as varied as code analysis, the scope for faster and more accurate software development has never been greater.
AI can reduce cognitive load and improve developer productivity in various stages of the development lifecycle, according to Balaji Sivasubramanian (pictured), senior director of product management at Red Hat Inc. AI has the potential to improve productivity in repetitive tasks, such as email and chat, by multiple times.
“I think one of the biggest challenges is the ability to reduce the cognitive load, and the AI will go a long way in reducing that,” Sivasubramanian said. “Today, just like with any other activity a developer is doing, there’s a lot of things that could help. You have seen GitHub Copilot as one of the ways to reduce the time to develop code, but there’s also many ways you can have AI to assist in improving their productivity.”
Becoming a platform player
Building models and getting productive was hard before, but now, with foundational models and the ability to tune them to custom data, productivity gain is available to all organizations. Red Hat is an open-source platform company focused on building and deploying new applications, managing the life cycle of models and bringing in open-source models for production. At the moment, it is working to help organizations overcome barriers to AI adoption and implement it in production to drive productivity improvements across industries, according to Sivasubramanian.
“One of the key things we are trying to do is to have a platform to build your new application. Basically, how do you get the data, get ingested, train, build, deploy and monitor the model and lifecycle of the model?” he said. “Because models are not just one and done; it’s always changing. That’s on the model side of the house. Then you have the application that takes advantage of the models, and you have to do the lifecycle of that. Our job is to be a platform player.”
Having multiple choices and competition is important for improving security and reducing dependence on a single provider in AI regulation and governance, Sivasubramanian pointed out. The momentum has shifted, and people are converging and moving in the right direction. There is a sense of security and maturity in the governance of technology.
“The convergence is happening much faster. If you look at the AWS keynote today, they talked about producing different choices for customers,” Sivasubramanian said. “Everybody’s talking that same language, and I think it’s the right thing. If you look at the previous technology wave that happened, at the end of the day, that’s what happened — it’s the choices, it’s the self-governance.”

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